The Gates of Eden

The Gates of Eden

Language: English

Pages: 186

ISBN: 1434435725

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Despite the development of a faster-than-light drive, Earth’s space program has been in the doldrums for centuries, as has Earth itself. Hyperspace being impossible to navigate without beacons at which to aim, there is no alternative but to wait for vessels sent out at sub-light speed decades previously to find somewhere worth going. Unfortunately, when a worthwhile planet finally turns up, it doesn’t take long for political conflicts to materialize over its exploitation. Then, when an entire survey team perishes, the problems intensify. Lee Caretta is the man most likely to solve the problem—if his conflict-ridden employers will let him, if he can keep his tendencey to suffer unexplained blackouts under control, and if the world really is sufficiently Earth-like not to be deadly to the explorers. And then the humans begin to die once more! Despite the development of a faster-than-light drive, Earth’s space program has been in the doldrums for centuries, as has Earth itself. Hyperspace being impossible to navigate without beacons at which to aim, there is no alternative but to wait for vessels sent out at sub-light speed decades previously to find somewhere worth going. Unfortunately, when a worthwhile planet finally turns up, it doesn’t take long for political conflicts to materialize over its exploitation. Then, when an entire survey team perishes, the problems intensify. Lee Caretta is the man most likely to solve the problem—if his conflict-ridden employers will let him, if he can keep his tendencey to suffer unexplained blackouts under control, and if the world really is sufficiently Earth-like not to be deadly to the explorers. And then the humans begin to die once more!

The Atlantis Plague (The Origin Mystery, Book 2)

Between Heaven and Earth (Seven the Series, Book 1)

The Mammoth Book of Mountain Disasters: True Accounts of Rescue from the Brink of Death

The Osiris Curse (Tweed & Nightingale Adventure, Book 2)

The Red Death (Caesar's Sword, Book 1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

routine. I had been so very ready to doze off when night fell because of the marginal desynchronization between the natural event and the artificial day/night cycle aboard the Earth Spirit, which I had kept to even on the Ariadne. Night, on Naxos, was a fraction over ten Earthly hours long. My habit has always been to sleep for seven. (I could have gotten by on five were it not for the loss of benefit on nightmare nights.) Ergo, I woke up about an hour before dawn, and looked up at the bright

Three.” Either way, it stacked up the same. We had twelve worlds on the books that boasted so-called Earthlike biology, but only two of them were worlds where human beings—or Calicoi—could walk around in comfort. The rest had no life more complicated than protista, and not enough oxygen to allow a man to breathe. For fifty years we’d been looking for the third world. It looked very much as if I’d hit the jackpot by being in exactly the right place at exactly the right time. Politically speaking,

captain.” “How did he come to leave his supper behind?” asked Zeno, who didn’t sound particularly surprised by the unexpected turn of events. “I frightened him by letting off a flare,” I said. “Our arrival here seems to be having a traumatic effect on all and sundry.” “How was the spear sharpened?” “Nothing complicated,” I answered. “It seems to have been honed down by scraping it on a rock. The cane is common enough—it grows in clumps in the mud. It’s not what one might describe as high

grounded just because I lose a few memories here and there? They’re personal—they don’t affect my work. I’m one of the top men in my field. What could I do if I was grounded? All the vital research in paratellurian stuff is quarantined—the satellite stations, Marsbase. What the hell do you expect?” “Lee,” said Angelina, her voice slow with the embarrassment, “I think you should see someone about it. About the nightmares. You really ought to find out why....” “For Christ’s sake!” I shouted at

hundredth generation to be born here. I wondered what kind of changes might have been made at the biochemical level by natural selection operating in zero g, and wondered briefly whether I ought to start hunting spiders to prepare for a long-term study. Then I remembered that there wasn’t time, and made a mental note to put the idea on the dictaphone. Come to think of it, spiders implied flies—some prey species, at least, maybe feeding on bits of human skin and other debris that collected here.

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